Progress On Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication In Ohio

Ohio ALB
In Ohio, PPQ Officer Brewster Frusher looks for signs of ALB in host trees using a high magnification fieldscope. Photo by USDA.

This past November, the USDA Plant Protection & Quarantine (PPQ) Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program in Ohio celebrated another victory—the ALB quarantine is officially 7.5 square miles smaller! This invasive beetle from Asia is a destructive wood-boring pest that feeds on maple and other hardwoods, eventually killing them. After completing their final round of tree inspection surveys, the ALB staff reported no sign of the beetle in a portion of East Fork State Park in Clermont County, OH.

“Inspecting ALB host trees is painstaking work, and the staff meticulously survey for the pest,” said ALB National Policy Manager Kathryn Bronsky. “It’s been three years since the last time we’ve lifted ALB quarantine restrictions in Ohio, and this is the first removal of the initial area placed under quarantine. That makes this success especially gratifying.” ALB Ohio

In 2018, there were two other smaller areas in Ohio removed from ALB quarantine. Today PPQ and the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) continue to regulate and conduct eradication activities in the remaining 49-square-mile ALB quarantine in Tate Township, and portions of Batavia and Williamsburg townships and East Fork State Park.

PPQ and ODA staff use an integrated approach to eradicate ALB. This includes establishing quarantines, inspecting trees, removing infested trees, sometimes removing at-risk host trees or using insecticide treatments, and conducting outreach. Tree and landscape companies can form compliance agreements with the eradication program.

“ALB eradication is a team effort, and we count on everyone working together to eliminate this invasive tree killer,” Bronsky said. “We have a tremendous partnership with Ohio’s Department of Agriculture, contractors, industry, and area residents, so I’m confident ALB Program successes will continue.”

Public Plays Critical Role

In five cases, it was residents, not agricultural officials, who detected signs of new ALB infestations—in Brooklyn, NY; Worcester and Boston, MA; Bethel, OH; and most recently in Hollywood, SC!  This shows how critical raising public awareness can be. With no cure, early identification and eradication are critical to combatting the ALB and saving trees.

ALBs leave many clues on or near infested trees, here’s what to look for:

  • Round holes at least three-eighths of an inch in diameter, where adult beetles chewed their way out of the tree
  • Pits on the bark that female beetles chew to deposit their eggs
  • Accumulation of sawdust-like material (insect waste) around the base of the tree or branches
  • Dieback in the tree canopy, or an unseasonable change in leaf color

Round holes

Round holes

Pits on bark

Pits on bark

Sawdust-like material

Sawdust-like material

Dieback

Dieback

All Photos: USDA
For more on ALB control, read Native Wasp May Help ALB Eradication Efforts.

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